Category Archives for "WordPress"

How to Geo-target Datafeedr Content With GeoTargetingWP?

Datafeedr has no built-in geo-targeting functionality. That doesn’t mean you can’t geo-target Datafeedr content on your site! Meet GeoTargetingWP – an excellent plugin to help you geo-target any content. Let’s find out if it works seamlessly together with Datafeedr.

We regularly receive support tickets from Datafeedr customers asking whether it’s possible or not to show products or comparison sets based on a visitor’s geographic location. Here are just a few of the questions we recently received…

Because Datafeedr has no geo-targeting capabilities we’re going to review and test GeoTargetingWP – one of the best geo-targeting WordPress plugins on the market today – to find out if it works seamlessly together with Datafeedr. In other words we want to find out if we’re able to show / hide products based on a visitor’s geographic location.

How Does GeoTargetingWP Work?

GeoTargetingWP is a premium geo-targeting WordPress plugin which helps you geo-target your content via different methods. The service is using a geolocation database that – according to the site – accurately targets 99.9% of your site visitors.

When a visitor lands on a page on your site which is using geo-targeting functionality, the plugin will send the user’s IP address to the database and then gets returned the visitor’s geographical info. Based on that info the visitor is served the default content or specific content tailored to the visitor’s country, state or even city.

One call to GeoTargetingWP’s database counts as 1 API request. Because the location info is saved during the session any additional page views from the same visitor won’t generate additional API requests to the server.

How Much Does GeoTargetingWP Cost?

GeoTargetingWP is a subscription based service. The pricing model is based on the number of API requests your site makes to the geolocation database per month. The more pages on your site use geo-targeting functionality and the more traffic your site gets, the more API requests you’ll need.

At the time of this writing there are 5 pricing plans varying from $9 per month (allowing your site to call the geolocation database 10,000 times) up to $199 per month (allowing your site to make up to 2,000,000 API requests). The good news is that each plan can be used on unlimited sites so with one license you can use the plugin on as many sites as you wish. Each plan comes with a free 14-day trial (no credit card needed).

Do I need GeoTargetingWP?

That’s up to you, of course. Once you have an established site, your site will get traffic from all around the world. If you could show your visitors products from their local retailers in the local currency, don’t you think this would drastically improve user experience and your site’s conversion rate? You bet!

GeoTargetingWP can geo-target almost any part of your website like entire posts and pages or parts of it, custom post types like WooCommerce products, sidebar widgets, entire menus or individual menu items, banners and links,… The possibilities are really endless. So let’s do some tests to find out whether Datafeedr and GeoTargetingWP seamlessly work together.

TEST 1: Geo-Targeting Datafeedr Comparison Sets in Blog Posts

So let’s test and see if it’s possible to display a different comparison set in a single blog post based on the visitor’s location. In this test I’m going to target visitors from USA (USD), UK (GBP) and NL (EUR). The product we’re focusing on is the Braun 7898CC shaver.

Via the Datafeedr scratchpad I’m researching which USA, UK and NL merchants sell the Braun 7898CC shaver. Then I select my favorite merchants in the WordPress admin > Datafeedr API > Merchants area. In the blog post I’m going to add the Datafeedr Comparison Set shortcodes for each comparison set.

Without geo-targeting functionality the post would look like this – 3 comparison sets in a row with the first comparison set targeting USA visitors, the second comparison set targeting UK visitors and the last comparison set targeting NL visitors.

Our goal is to just display one single comparison set based on the visitor’s location. UK visitors should only see the GBP comparison set, NL visitors only the EUR comparison set and USA vistors only the USD comparison set. For all other countries I’m going to display the USD comparison set.

Applying geo-targeting in this case is easy by using the GeoTargetingWP shortcodes. To add geo-targeting to the comparison sets I just surround the Datafeedr Comparison Set shortcodes with the GeoTargetingWP shortcodes like in the screenshot below.

As I’ve chosen to display always the USA comparison set except for UK and NL visitors I’m only excluding the countries UK and NL by setting the exclude_country attribute = GB and NL.

To display the GBP comparison set only to UK visitors I’m setting the country attribute = GB and to display the EUR comparison set only to NL visitors I’m setting the country attribute = NL.

To test whether the right comparison set is displayed to the right visitor I’m using one of my favorite VPN solutions – NordVPN. This solution allows you to hide and change your IP address by redirecting your internet connection through one of NordVPN’s servers available in 50+ countries worldwide.

So to simulate I’m a UK visitor I’ll launch NordVPN on my desktop and select United Kingdom in the app. Once connected to a NordVPN server in the UK I’m now able to browse with the server’s UK IP address.

When I reload the page with the 3 comparison sets I’m now only seeing the GBP comparison set!

Now I’m doing the same to test the comparison set I’ve built for NL visitors. In the NordVPN app I disconnect from the server in the UK and connect to a NordVPN server in NL.

When I reload the page with the 3 comparison sets I’m now only seeing the EUR comparison set!

As final test I disconnect from the server in NL and connect to a NordVPN server in USA.

When I reload the page with the 3 comparison sets I’m now only seeing the USD comparison set!

When disconnecting fom NordVPN entirely I’m still seeing the USD comparison set. As I live in Belgium and I didn’t build a specific comparison set for my country I’m getting the default comparison set displayed.

GeoTargetingWP works like a charm! This was just a simple test with only 3 countries. You can not only geo-target countries but also states, cities and zip codes. You can also group countries, cities, zip codes and states into “regions”. Then target those regions with specific content. Really, the possibilities are endless.

TEST 2: Geo-Targeting Products in WooCommerce Store Categories

Now let’s do another test and see if it’s possible to display different products in a store category based on the visitor’s location. Here are a few options I tested and work well with GeoTargetingWP.

OPTION 1: Geo-target on product level

When the number of products in your store is limited, you can geotarget each single product by specifying when it should show or hide. Let’s illustrate this with an example.

I’ve addded the Braun 7898CC from a UK, US, DE, NL and SE retailer into a single store category. As you can see in below screenshot without geo-targeting it doesn’t look good with the same product appearing multiple times and in different currencies in the same category.

To geo-target on product level just go to the WordPress admin > Products area. Then edit the product you wish to geo-target and set up the appropriate settings in the “GeoTargeting page settings”. In the screenshot below you see the settings for the GBP product. The product will only be displayed for visitors from the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland. I’ve set up similar settings for the other 4 products.

To test I’m using my favorite VPN solution again – NordVPN. So to simulate I’m a UK visitor for example I select United Kingdom in the NordVPN app. Once connected to a NordVPN server in the UK I’m now able to browse with the server’s UK IP address. When reloading my category page I now see only the product from VERY! The other 4 products are hidden.

OPTION 2: Geo-target on store category level

Instead of geo-targeting each product individually (as in option 1) you can also choose to set up categories per country and geo-target categories by specifying when they should show or hide.

Let’s illustrate this with a simple example. In the WordPress admin > Products > Categories area I created 3 “Braun Series 7” store categories – one for USA, one for UK and one for NL. Products from USA merchants go into the first category, Products from UK merchants go into the second category and products from NL merchants go into the third category. To keep it simple I added 1 product in each single category.

As you can see in below screenshot without geo-targeting all 3 products appear on the shop page and it doesn’t look good with the same categories appearing multiple times in the sidebar.

Let’s apply geo-targeting. UK visitors should only see the UK category, NL visitors only the NL category and USA vistors only the USD category. For all other countries I’m going to display the USD category.

To geo-target on category level just go back to the WordPress admin > Products > Categories area. Then edit each category you wish to geo-target and set up the appropriate settings. In the screenshot below you see the setting for the GBP product.

I’m doing the same for NL by adding country code NL to the”Include Countries” field. As I’ve chosen to display always the USA category except for UK and NL visitors I’m using the “Exclude Countries” field and exclude the countries GB and NL.

To test whether the right store category is displayed I’m using NordVPN again. Let’s test this for NL. Once connected to a server in the Netherlands I’m reloading the shop page and now I’m seeing only the product from bol.com.

Let’s test if this is working for a country I’m not targeting. In that case I should see the US product. Let’s connect to a server in Canada. Once connected I’m reloading the page and bam …. the US category and product shows!

Conclusion

These were just a couple of simple tests to show you how simple it is to serve different products based on your visitor’s location. After playing around with the plugin for a couple of weeks now I’ve become a huge fan and I can say this is the best geo-targeting plugin I’ve used so far.

If you want to serve more relevant content based on your visitor’s location, keep the wrong audience away, improve your site’s performance and conversion rate, then I highly recommend to look into GeoTargetingWP. Sign up for the free 14-day trial (no credit card needed) here.

4 Ways to Monetize Your Website With Datafeedr

Since 2008, Datafeedr has helped thousands of affiliate marketers worldwide monetize their websites. Having the biggest affiliate product database worldwide and a powerful search engine to search across different affiliate networks and excellent tech support Datafeedr has become the number 1 affiliate datafeed integration service for affiliates worldwide. If you’re new to Datafeedr here’s a quick overview how you can monetize your website with affiliate content.

1: Create a WooCommerce Affiliate Store

The Datafeedr WooCommerce Importer Plugin allows you to search, select and import affiliate products from Datafeedr’s huge database (at the time of this writing 600+ million products) into your WordPress website and display those products using one of the most popular eCommerce platforms, WooCommerce.

To get an idea about the store building process just watch this video in which Eric shows you how easy it is to import affiliate products into your WordPress WooCommerce store.

Each product has its own landing page. The Buy Now button (affiliate link) redirects to the corresponding product page on the merchant’s site. Want to bypass the single product pages on your website entirely? No problem. It’s possible to make all of the product links on your product category pages go directly to the merchant’s website.

2: Supplement Your WooCommerce Product Detail Pages by Adding Price Comparison Sets

By default, a WooCommerce theme uses a generic page to show basic product information like product name, description, image and price for example. To make your product pages more unique you can use the Datafeedr Comparison Sets Plugin to supplement the product information with a price comparison set.

When the WooCommerce Integration option in the plugin is activated, a price comparison set will be automatically created for each product in your WooCommerce store – ie. if any product matches are found in the product feeds from your selected merchants.

3: Embed Price Comparison Sets into Blog Posts and Pages or any Other Area Where WordPress Shortcodes are Allowed

If you prefer not to create an affiliate store… no worries… you can still use Datafeedr to monetize your site content. Datafeedr’s Comparison Sets Plugin also allows you to embed Price Comparison Sets in your blog posts, pages or in any other area where WordPress shortcodes are allowed. Ideal for affiliates with product review websites.

4: Create Your Own Custom Solution by Using the Datafeedr API

Are you a developer and want to create your own custom solution? The Datafeedr API provides a powerful interface that enables you to programmatically find and filter product and coupon data from the affiliate networks and merchants Datafeedr supports giving you the keys to build something awesome! The API does not handle anything other than allowing you to query Datafeedr’s huge product database and returning products. The rest is up to you or your developer(s) :). Click here to access the API documentation.

4 Create your own WordPress shortcode for Permalinks

I cringe every time I see a link in a blog post that is an absolute URL to other content on the same site. Here’s an example of what I mean:

In that example post you see a link to another page in my blog.

But what happens when you edit the slug of the post? The link will break.

Or what happens if you move your blog from /blog to /news? The link will break.

Or even worse, what happens if you change the domain where the content is hosted from http://www.mysite.com to http://blog.mysite.com? The link will break.

That’s why I cringe every time I see a link with an absolute URL to another page on the same site.

What’s the solution? Shortcodes.

Here’s an example of how to programmatically add links to your posts without being susceptible to the problems I mentioned above. The following code can be added to your theme’s functions.php file or to a custom plugin you might have.

After you add that code to your site, here’s how you can use it when writing a blog post or page.

To get the link to another post on your site all you need is the ID of the post you want to link to. Then in your post you would do something like this:

Now my link’s URL will be generated from the database and no matter how much we edit the other post’s slug or path, the correct URL will always appear in this link.

What if you want to avoid creating the <a href="">...</a> HTML code? That’s easy. Just do this:

Now when the post is rendered, the <a> tag will automatically be created and the title of the post will show up.

If you want to control the title of the link, you can do this:

Let me provide one last example to clear up any confusion… Let’s say you wrote a post on your blog. The post you wrote is titled Hello, World!, it has a slug of hello-world and the post has the ID of 33.

Here’s what the shortcode would look like in your posts and what would be returned:

Hope this helps future-proof the links in your blog posts.

2 Plugins are good for you, but only in moderation

In the recent redesign of Datafeedr we choose 9 plugins (including 1 custom plugin) to build the new site. I don’t like to build sites using too many plugins. The more plugins that you activate the slower your site will potentially run. Also, the more plugins you have the more maintenance and updates you have to do. However the biggest reason I don’t install too many plugins is out of fear that those plugins won’t survive the next (minor or major) release of WordPress or will be abandoned/neglected by the plugin authors. I don’t hold that against the plugin developers. The plugins are free. Their time is expensive. Things change. Interests shift. Life happens.

I wanted to share the 9 plugins we used to build Datafeedr:

Over the next few weeks I’ll post about some of these plugins, what I like about them and in some cases how I tweaked them to suite our needs.